Awesome New Video! “What If Times” by Shinobi Ninja

This video is from a new acquaintance I met online and I think it’s fabulous!  Check it out!

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Podcast Interview Tomorrow, March 19: Author Raynetta Manees

This is an invitation to my radio Podcast interview that will be tomorrow March 19 at 1 o’clock.  PODCAST ADDRESS:   https://worshipradiodetroit.com/glamour-shoppe-talk/

MY AMAZON AUTHOR PAGE:  amazon.com/author/raynettamanees

Hope you can join us!

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In Homage to “Black Panther”- The PantherPuff Girls!

The Pantherpuff Girls are here for ! We must see, respect & honor the different kinds of strength that women possess. Give a voice to women around the world and take the pledge for ’s : Art:

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Black History In My Novels Part V “All For Love: The SuperStar”

Happy Black History Month!  Although I write fiction I incorporate factual Black History into my books.  Throughout this month I have been posting excerpts from my novels that reference Black history.  This is the last and fifth installment, an excerpt from my most recent romance novel, which was a finalist for the 2017 Emma Award for the Best Contemporary Romance of the year,  All For Love: The SuperStar.

“As soon as Mate reached the top of the terrace steps, the orchestra began to play the “Triumphal March” from the opera “Aida” by Giuseppe Verdi.  

This was my amazing Angela’s homage to Black History for our wedding; her backdrop as she walked down the aisle.  In “Aida” the star and central character of the opera is a Nubian princess, and the role was famously sung by opera great, Leontyne Price.”

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Black History In My Novels Part IV “Fantasy”

Happy Black History Month!  Although I write fiction, I incorporate factual Black History into my books, and throughout this month I will be posting excerpts from my novels that reference Black history.    This is the fourth installment, an excerpt from my classic romance novel FANTASY.

Click picture to purchase!

Click picture to purchase!

 This excerpt is truly personal because it is based on an incident that really happened to me.  I am an avid cruiser, and this happened to me as I boarded a cruise ship several years ago:

“Sameerah stopped for a moment to show her ticket to the waiting steward, then continued up the gangplank to the cruise ship.  A fortyish woman in a blue uniform was greeting passengers.

“Hello!” the woman said brightly to a group of women boarding together.

“Good Afternoon!  Welcome aboard the Fantasy!” the woman said to the couple directly in front of Sameerah.

The woman’s eyes shifted in anticipation of warmly welcoming the next passenger.  Then her gaze focused on Sameerah.  The woman looked confused for a moment, then looked right through Sameerah, not saying a word.

The light-hearted holiday mood that was just beginning to build for Sameerah crashed in flames.  The woman’s gaze and silence said more clearly than words, “What are you doing here?”

Oh, no, Sameerah thought, hurt, angry, and indignant, all at the same time.  Do I have to deal with this crap even here?  Well, Missy Anne, I have as much right to be on this ship as anyone.  And I’ll be damned if I let you get away with ignoring me!

Sameerah stepped to her and fixed the woman with her brightest, phoniest smile.  “Hello!  How are you today?” she called to the woman in the most syrupy, artificial, nice-nasty tone she could muster.  The woman really looked at her then, giving Sameerah the uncertain, frightened gaze of an animal trapped in a corner.

Yeah, girlfriend, Sameerah thought with satisfaction.  We both know what time it is.  You know you were deliberately slighting me, and now you know I know you were deliberately slighting me.  As she continued into the ship, Sameerah chuckled to herself as the woman greeted the passengers boarding behind her, but with quite a bit less gushing gaiety than before.

Maybe you’ll think before you pull that crap again, Sameerah thought as she made a mental note to file a complaint about this heifer with the cruise director.”

 

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Black History In My Novels Part III “Wishing On A Star”

Happy Black History Month!  Although I write fiction, I incorporate factual Black History into my books, and throughout this month I will be posting excerpts from my novels that reference Black history.    This is the third installment, an excerpt from my classic romance novel WISHING ON A STAR:

“You should talk—Woodrow.”

Would that it was that simple–no pun intended.  At least there was a President named Woodrow.  My name’s not Woodrow, Shay.”

“It’s not?  Well, what is it?”

Woody looked at her self-consciously for a beat before saying softly, “It’s Woodington.”

“It’s what?”

“It’s ‘Woodington’, Shay.”

Shay paused a moment before asking, “Uh…How did you wind up with a name like Woodington?”

He smiled resignedly, “Wait; it gets worse.”  He stood, and drew himself up to his full height, “My full legal name is Woodington James Hollister–the third.  So you see how I got it.  I inherited it.”

Shay blinked, “Good Lord.”

“Woodington was my great-grandmother’s maiden name, and her father was born a slave.  He was one of the first post-slavery Blacks to get an education, and he became a teacher.”  Wood paused a moment, remembering.

“I’m sure you know that during slavery it was illegal for Blacks to learn to read,” he continued.  “Anyone who taught a slave to read was severely punished.  So my ancestor spent his life teaching other Black people how to read.  However, even though slavery had by then technically ended, he was caught teaching—and lost his life because of it.”

Shay looked up at Woody, spellbound by this tale.

“He had no sons.  Understandably, my multi-grandma, his daughter, was proud of him and didn’t want his name to die with him,  so she named my grandfather Woodington.”

“What a sad—and beautiful—story.  It’s a name you should be proud to bear.”

“It’s a mouthful.  When I was a kid, I got teased, and sure got into enough fights because of it.  But when I got old enough to understand…  Yes, I am proud of it.”

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#BlackHistoryMonth – A Conversation: #MayaAngelou & #DaveChappelle

A fantastic conversation between two geniuses.  They are discussing, among other things, Martin Luther King and Malcolm X. And in addition to the depth of the content of what they are each saying, what knocks me out is the obvious respect each has for the other.  They are 45 years apart in age, but Chappelle listens to and respects Ms. Angelou’s wisdom of experience, and she listens to and appreciates him and his viewpoint from a more recent era.   In a way, Chappell is a product of the things Ms. Angelou’s generation fought so hard for.  It’s like he is gaining knowledge on the processes that produced him, and she is learning about some of the fruits of her efforts.

 

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#MotownWriters February Romance Author Feature: Raynetta Manees

As promised, this is the link to my feature article on the Motown Writers website. I am so pleased and excited! Please check it out!

https://motownwriters.wordpress.com/2018/02/08/motownwriters-february-romance-author-feature-raynetta-manees-raynettaman/

 

 

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Motown Writers Michigan Literary Network Raynetta Manees Feature Article!

The Motown Writers Michigan Literary Network will host “Great Romance Authors” during the month of February and I am delighted to be one of the authors showcased on their website!  My feature will appear this Thursday, Feb. 8.  I will post the direct link when the article is up and available for viewing.  My thanks to sister author Sylvia Hubbard of the MWMLN!  Please see the poster below for all authors and dates.

 

#MotownWriters February Romance Author Features

Feb 5th: Mia Bailey – Book

Feb 8th: Raynetta Manees – Book

Feb 12th: Breathless – Book

Feb 15th: Parker J Cole – Book

Feb 19th: Jada Pearl – Book

Feb 22nd: India Norfleet – Book

Feb 26th: Kimberly Batchelor Davis – Book

Please support these authors by purchasing their book, gifting to a reader and then sharing this page 

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Beautiful Poem For Black Mothers And Daughters By Poet Oya

A few years ago I made the acquaintance of a wonderful black woman poet named Oya.  With her permission, I am re-posting this beautiful poem.  Click here to go to Oya’s Facebook page.

12039354_529823913865116_6694816767652268482_nDaughter you are beautiful
Your skin is a wonderful reflection of our ancestors
Daughter I promise to teach you to love the dark richness that others may make you question
Daughter you will learn as a child your history
The beauty and the ugly truths so you can know how strong and diverse a group of people you come from
Daughter if you should ever come home crying because someone called you names or defame you because of your darkness I promise to instill even more strength and power in you
So you can stand proud and stoic and be able to say my black skin is beautiful and walk around with a smile wearing your invisible crown
Daughter I will teach you as a Queen to always uplift other Kings And Queens because you are your sister and brothers keeper
We will pray together
Honor our ancestors
Walk in majesty until our dying day Daughter

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